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BLOCKHEAD EXPLAINS WHY ‘Wistfulness IS A SCAM’ – INCLUDING SOME OF THE HIP-HOP WE GREW UP ON.

BLOCKHEAD EXPLAINS WHY ‘Wistfulness IS A SCAM’ – INCLUDING SOME OF THE HIP-HOP WE GREW UP ON.

BLOCKHEAD

Key Sentence:

  • Veteran maker Blockhead (real name Tony Simon) has gotten back with another single called “Sentimentality Is A Scam.
  • The second contribution from his approaching collection Space Werewolves Will Is The End Of Us All.

Not all bad, the Manhattan-conceived beatmaker utilizes his unmistakable awareness of what’s funny to shroud his instrumental soundscapes.

“The title is tongue in cheek and half genuine,” Blockhead tells HipHopDX. “On one hand, sentimentality is everything. But, on the other hand, we as a whole like it, and it’s those things we are nostalgic about that regularly molded us into the grown-ups we are.

“All things considered, something we as a whole should concede is that a ton of the poop we experienced childhood with didn’t age well, and that is OK. Noble motivation ‘something is old or uncommon doesn’t mean it’s acceptable and admirable motivation ‘something implied a great deal to us at one point in our lives.

It doesn’t mean it needs to hold that equivalent weight perpetually. To take that further, a ton of the issues in this nation depend on nostalgia.”Blockhead additionally sees the equals to Donald Trump’s unique mission motto, “Make America Great Again.”

“For hell’s sake, ‘Make America Great Again’ is essentially a method of winking back at ‘bygone times,’ which were horrendous for the vast majority. Thus, I don’t prefer to get made up for a lost time a lot in wistfulness all in all.

Affectionately glancing back at things you cherished when you were more youthful is fine, and we as a whole do it. However, to make that where your development as an individual finished and base all conclusions on that time in your life is a terrible search for everyone.”

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Considering Blockhead has been making beats for quite a long time, he perceives the contradiction that he’s an idiot. He frequently utilizes the music of a former time to pepper his arrangements — from Digital Underground’s 1990 track “A Tribute To The Underground Days” for Aesop Rock’s 2001 exemplary “Light” to Fapardokly’s 1967 “The Music Scene” for Blockhead’s 2009 independent collection of a similar name.

“I’ve made a lifelong testing more seasoned music,” he concedes. “Nothing more needs to be said—we as whole fall casualties to tricks in some capacity. Likewise, I’d prefer to add that most of my tune titles are jokes and genuinely subjective, and this specific one fundamentally a tweet-turned-tune title, so don’t get frantic, individuals who live before. I’m old as well.”

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